response to student

response to student

Rosaline post,

Preeclampsia is still a big concern for women to this day, it has caused a number of deaths of expecting women as well as newborns. The literature states that “Preeclampsia is the major cause of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality” (Chaemsaithong, et al., 2020, para. 1). It is found that low-dose aspirin introduced before 16 weeks of pregnancy have significantly lessens the amount of preterm preeclampsia (Chaemsaithong, et al., 2020). It is imperative to detect pregnancies that are at risk of preeclampsia during the first trimester because time is very important in treating preeclampsia. Even though pregnant women are currently being screened for preeclampsia, it shows that only one test, the Family Medicine Foundation (FMF) has break pass the 50% mark of detection, but is still within 10% false positive rate (Chaemsaithong, et al., 2020, para. 1). The FMF triple test consisted of a “mixture of maternal factors and measurements of mean arterial pressure, uterine artery pulsatility index, and serum placental growth factor” (Chaemsaithong, et al., 2020, para.1). The triple test is considered more authentic with detection rates of “90% and 75% for the prediction of early and preterm preeclampsia, respectively, with a 10% false-positive rate” (Chaemsaithong, et al., 2020, para. 1).
According to Chaemsaithong et al (2020), the use of the FMF prediction model, followed by the administration of low-dose aspirin, has been shown to reduce the rate of preterm preeclampsia by 62% (para.1). Also, lot of studies have been done and found that screening done by checklist of maternal risk factors is no longer effective predicting preeclampsia successfully. It is very important to spread awareness in the community because preeclampsia is deadly and especially in minority groups living in this country. As part of teaching regarding their diet, exercises, preventive care, medications regiment; appropriate testing must be done and be a part of routine checkup on a regular basis. But, according to the authors the biggest challenge is because some women do not seek or receive prenatal care until late pregnancy. As nurses we must educate and emphasis the need for prenatal care from the start of a pregnancy until its end to prevent and hopefully put an end to preeclampsia (Chaemsaithong, et al., 2020).

 

Tyler post,

Population health education for preventative care methods can be tricky. The volume and diversity of populations require different strategies for properly distributing and communicating information. Aside from language differences between providers and patients, communication and information technologies also have to account for other SDOH like educational levels, cultural awareness, social stigmas, availability of community resources, negative emotions (such as fear/shame) and learning styles. Research suggests visual metaphors to decrease taboos related to anatomy and minimize text related communication to decrease language/educational barriers increases tactile knowledge related to importance of proper self-examinations by 86%; this better understanding of visual signs could lead to decreased mortality due to earlier detection and reporting of symptoms (Ellsworth Beaumont, 2016). Nurses and health care advocates for breast cancer prevention can use simple, yet effective forms of communication to reach multiple audiences. Clear, simple and concise information is more effective at engaging the public (Ellsworth Beaumont, 2016). Billboards, pamphlets, handouts, posters, short videos in offices, clinics and public places can help reach a larger portion of the population.
Other studies show increased breast cancer awareness via more technological means, such as phone call lines, apps, texts, online chat, social media, or other mobile electronic platforms. This modality is gaining popularity for information disbursement, but still faces many challenges regarding access to disparate populations (Salako, et al., 2016